Roasted tomato and garlic soup

Tomato soup is one of those things on the list of “Oh, I thought I didn’t like that,” which has gotten shorter and shorter as I’ve gotten older.

For years I despised tomato soup, because I thought it all tasted like Campbell’s Cream of Tomato, which always tasted tinny on my tongue and then itched in my throat going down.

My Dad liked it though, and our little cat at the time, Truffles, would lap it furiously out of her bowl the instant the bowl was put on the floor (she would coat the wall in orange splatter, unable to wait until it cooled even slightly to dive in), so we always had cans of it in the pantry. I preferred Cream of Mushroom, but I was in the minority.

You don’t need beautiful tomatoes for this; the ruddy, ugly, sort of soft or bruised ones are fine. The secret to good tomato soup is to roast the tomatoes first. Though around here that isn’t such a secret – a friend at work pointed out that roasting is my go-to technique for just about every ingredient. It sounds like I might be a bit predictable. But anyway. Roast the tomatoes. And the garlic. Use too much garlic. This is the future, and we’re okay with that now.

Roasted tomato and garlic soup

(Serves six)

  • 5 medium field tomatoes (2 1/2 to 3 pounds)
  • 3 heads of garlic plus three cloves, peeled
  • Olive oil
  • Salt
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 2 tsp. ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp. red pepper flakes (or to taste)
  • 1/2 tsp. dried oregano
  • 4 cups vegetable or chicken stock
  • 1/2 cup fresh basil leaves, packed
  • 1/2 cup fresh parsley leaves, packed

Lightly grease a 9×13 pan. Preheat your oven to 300°F.

Quarter tomatoes, and line up in the pan. Scatter the peeled cloves from three heads of garlic over top. Drizzle olive oil over the contents of the pan, and sprinkle about a teaspoon of coarse salt over as well. Roast for 90 minutes to two hours, until tomatoes have withered and garlic is deeply golden. (This step you can do in advance; I like to roast a lot of tomatoes and garlic and stick them in freezer bags for easy weeknight dinners during the winter.)

In a large, heavy-bottomed pot, heat two tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high heat. Add three remaining cloves of garlic. Sauté onion until translucent, then add pepper, pepper flakes, and oregano, stirring to coat. Add tomatoes and garlic to the pot, scraping any solids that remain in the pan into the pot. Stir.

Add stock, and reduce heat to medium. Simmer 10 to 15 minutes, until later garlic cloves have softened. Purée using an immersion blender. Taste, adjusting seasonings as needed, then add basil and parsley and purée again. Add water to thin to desired consistency, if needed.

Serve drizzled with olive oil.

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12 thoughts on “Roasted tomato and garlic soup

  1. I made soup very similar to this last year; I also thinly sliced and oven roasted the spiciest sausage the butcher shop had, and then cooked the soup pretty much as you suggest, but then before serving divided up the sausage into the bowls with the soup and this is a total run-on sentence because it was that good …

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  2. I feel the same way – as I age my list of food-non-grata has gotten smaller!! I’m not sure I’m happy about this change, though. It makes one feel very, very old.

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  3. Eileen: Spicy sausage makes everything better. That’s one of those true facts.

    Mango: Old, but smug – being completely omnivorous IS something to brag about. Now if we could just do away with green peppers and raisins …

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  4. That soup stirs some memories. I have an abundance of lovely fresh garden tomatoes and fresh garlic. This soup could be nice with a layer of melted cheese or cheese toast on the side.

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    1. It’s weird, I know. The people who think there can be too much garlic are probably the same people who think that frying meat in bacon fat is excessive and that you can enjoy a bite of chocolate more than a whole box if you just get the right kind.

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  5. It was THAT good! Boy and Girl licked their bowls clean. A keeper. And I made it with roasted frozen produce from my over abundant tomato garden… Bonus!

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